Tesla is recalling roughly 54,000 vehicles due to a self-driving problem.

The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) sought the recall, citing a safety concern for road users.

Tesla is recalling roughly 54,000 vehicles due to a self-driving problem.
Tesla is recalling roughly 54,000 vehicles due to a self-driving problem.

Tesla has already recalled tens of thousands of vehicles in the United States this year. Elon Musk's company is recalling roughly 54,000 electric vehicles of various types to disable the "rolling stop" feature, which can prevent vehicles from stopping at stop signs in certain circumstances.

Tesla is recalling 53,822 vehicles in the United States from 2017 to 2022, including the Model 3 from 2017 to 2022, the Model S from 2016 to 2022, the Model X from 2016 to 2022, and the Model Y from 2020 to 2022. The rolling stop feature, which is accessible on all cars equipped with the Full Self Driving (FSD) beta, has been judged hazardous by the national highway safety agency while crossing all-way stops (four-lane junctions each with a stop sign). Clearly, the latter has a difficult existence at Tesla (and rightly so).

The car can engage at a speed not exceeding 9 km/h without stopping at the stop sign if it encounters a variety of criteria (arriving at less than 9 km/h, not detecting cars, pedestrians, or bicycles moving at the intersection, having sufficient sight, etc.). In October 2021, a possibly harmful feature was deployed.

Tesla and the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration met on January 10 and 19 to discuss the matter, and on January 20, a voluntary recall decision was filed. As a result, Tesla plans to release a new update in February that would disable the rolling stop feature for the 54,000 cars equipped with the FSD system. Despite this, the corporation wanted to make it clear that no accidents had been reported as a result of the rolling stop.

Tesla has issued another vehicle recall

Tesla has had a number of run-ins with the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA), most recently in the last few months. We recall the mass recall of hundreds of thousands of Model S vehicles in the United States for dangerous goods at the end of last December, following the discovery of engineering flaws that also affected the Model 3. The latter compromised the integrity of the rear-view camera connection cable, resulting in the likelihood of a front cover opening without warning, potentially obstructing the driver's visibility.

Editor's Choice:

Volkswagen and Bosch have teamed together to create software for self-driving cars

Another issue that has gotten a lot of attention in December is the fact that he can play video games on his Tesla while driving, games that are natively incorporated into the central dashboard. Following the release of an article in the New York Times, the NHTSA pegged Elon Musk's company, and Tesla had to backtrack by prohibiting drivers from using the Passenger Play feature while the vehicle is in motion.